Windows Server Developer Preview – DHCP

We need a new DHCP for WDS and for connecting clients that we need to join in this domain. Lets try out Windows Server 8’s DHCP then!

DHCP: Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) is a client/server protocol that automatically provides an Internet Protocol (IP) host with its IP address and other related configuration information such as the subnet mask and default gateway. RFCs 2131 and 2132 define DHCP as an Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) standard based on Bootstrap Protocol (BOOTP), a protocol with which DHCP shares many implementation details. DHCP allows hosts to obtain required TCP/IP configuration information from a DHCP server.

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd145320(WS.10).aspx

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For lab purposes, we will install the DHCP with the AD role but DO NOT DO THIS AT PRODUCTION or ANYWHERE ELSE. Its only for Lab and test setup.

Moving on.. Click add roles.

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So on add roles and features wizard click next.

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Do a role-based installation, click next again.

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Select DHCP then next

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We do not have to install any roles and features, so click next.

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Click next again.

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I always use the wizards auto restart if required.

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Wait for it to finish, grab  a coffee or something.

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After DHCP has been installed, click Complete DHCP configuration don’t close just yet.

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On the post-install wizard, click next.

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We may need to authorize the DHCP on our Active Directory.

Stop, what is DHCP authorization again?

Starting with the release of Windows 2000, there is an Active Directory feature that prevents rogue Windows 2000-based DHCP servers from running. When a DHCP server running Windows 2000 or later starts, it first checks Active Directory to confirm its authorization to run. If the server has explicitly been authorized as a DHCP server, it is allowed to run. By default, the DHCP server checks its authorization every sixty minutes.

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd296633(WS.10).aspx

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Click commit. Then close.

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Back on the dashboard, you can now see the DHCP server tab.

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To manage my new and shiny DHCP, I go to start and see the DHCP Tiles.

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Expand the contents of DHCP.

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Using DHCP, you may need to create a new Scope.

A DHCP scope consists of a pool of IP addresses on a specific subnet, such as 192.168.0.1 to 192.168.0.254, that the DHCP server can lease to clients

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd759218.aspx

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This will be for all of the clients that will be connecting.

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I will have IP addresses from 100 to 200 be assigned to these clients.

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Within the scope, you can include an exclusion. These IP’s will not be assigned.

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Lets go with 8 days.

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Click next.

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Auto assign your gateway.

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And the DNS server too.

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WINS, I don’t have (yet) on my lab.

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In order to use this Scope, you must activate it or turn it on.

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Click Finish!

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You may also want to see the newly created DHCP groups, you can check the Active Directory Users and Computers:

DHCP Groups: When you install the DHCP Server service, two domain local groups are created: DHCP Users and DHCP Administrators.

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd183645(WS.10).aspx

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johndelizo

John is currently creating digital assets that protects people and their future, a technical trainer and a full time geek specializing on development and deployment of innovations created with .NET framework on Windows platform as well as Windows infrastructure projects. He is the primary contact of the Philippine Windows Users Group, a contributor at the Microsoft Philippines Community forums and regularly conducts community sessions as well as other Microsoft technology events. John owns the Busy Saving The World Techblog.

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